A Gift Appreciated Worldwide

Mark Darnell

ONDA’s Wild Desert Calendar Goes Abroad

Giving a Wild Desert Calendar as a gift has become something of a tradition among a number of ONDA members. So, where do all these calendars go? We asked a few of our longtime calendar givers — members Susie Neubauer, Patty Giffin, Terry Butler, Sidney Henderson and Mark Montgomery — to give us the scoop.

As it turns out, from their gift-giving alone, scenes from Oregon’s high desert have enchanted people across the United States and in France, Switzerland, Germany, Denmark, Canada and Australia.

Across the board, these members appreciated the opportunity to give a gift that doubled as a way to support one of their favorite organizations.

“I love that it is two-fold: ONDA gets the donation and I give a gift,” said Susie Neubauer.

Patty Giffin said she gives the calendars “so people know why I volunteer my time to help conserve these places.”

These gift-givers also appreciate the way that the calendar introduces people to a corner of the world that’s not so well-known.

“I have been sending calendars to my friends and family on the east coast for over 10 years as they have little idea of what eastern Oregon is like,” said Sid Henderson.

“People are very impressed,” noted Neubauer.

And, what happens when all these folks see the stunning beauty that Oregon’s high desert has to offer?

“They’ve been a very effective tool in getting family and friends from around the world to come visit me in Bend,” said Mark Montgomery.

It’s was the same story from Sid Henderson, who told us, “My friends in Adelaide, Australia, are coming next May … to the US for the first time and to see Central Oregon and the rest of the northwest.”

And again for Terry Butler, who said, “Everybody loves the calendar. They’ll often ask about places shown in the calendar and want to go there.”

It’s an aspiration the gift-givers have too.

As Giffin exclaimed, “I wish I had time to get to all the beautiful places in those pictures!”

voices

Durlin Hicock, Alice Elshoff Award winner

Durlin Hicock, Alice Elshoff Award winner

“Protecting public land is part of my spiritual being. It’s central to my identity to be in wilderness and to see it protected.” Durlin is proud to protect public lands for future generations, saying, “The highlight of my childhood was our family’s weekend outdoor trips. I look forward to my grandchildren having similar experiences outside in their lifetimes, and it wouldn’t be possible without ONDA.”

watch

Stewardship Fence Building Timelapse

Stewardship Fence Building Timelapse

fact

What defines Oregon’s high desert?

What defines Oregon’s high desert?

Bounded by the Cascade Mountains to the west and the Blue Mountains to the north, Oregon’s high desert covers approximately 24,000 square miles. Annual rainfall in the high desert varies from 5 to 14 inches. The average elevation is 4,000 feet; at 9,733 feet, the summit of Steens Mountain is the highest point in Oregon’s high desert. The terrain of the high desert was mostly formed by a series of lava flows that occurred between 30 and 10 million years ago.

Sources: The Oregon Encyclopedia; Wikipedia  

Sid Henderson also told us that the friend who has appreciated the calendar most is “a German man who gave me a ride from Bangui, Central Africa to Juba, Sudan for sixteen days across the Obo Road in 1976.”
Now, that’s a story we want to hear around the campfire!
If you’ve got a great Wild Desert Calendar story to share, please drop us a line at onda@onda.org. We’re always eager to hear more.