Give yourself a pat on the back! You accomplished so much for Oregon’s desert this year!

Flip through this year in review for just a handful of the many great stories to come out of 2018.

fact

Bobcat

Bobcat

Found only in North America, where it is the most common wildcat, the bobcat takes its common name from its stubby, or “bobbed,” tail. The cats range in length from two to four feet and weigh 14 to 29 pounds. Bobcats mainly hunt rabbits and hares, but they will also eat rodents, birds, bats, and even adult deer.

Latin name: Lynx rufus fasciatus

 

fact

What defines Oregon’s high desert?

What defines Oregon’s high desert?

Bounded by the Cascade Mountains to the west and the Blue Mountains to the north, Oregon’s high desert covers approximately 24,000 square miles. Annual rainfall in the high desert varies from 5 to 14 inches. The average elevation is 4,000 feet; at 9,733 feet, the summit of Steens Mountain is the highest point in Oregon’s high desert. The terrain of the high desert was mostly formed by a series of lava flows that occurred between 30 and 10 million years ago.

Sources: The Oregon Encyclopedia; Wikipedia  

watch

Stewardship Fence Building Timelapse

Stewardship Fence Building Timelapse

ONDA members and volunteers pictured:
in the 2, top to bottom, right to left: Mary Beth Pinon, long-nosed snake, Barbara Engel, John Bauman, Susan Zimmerman, Danny Archibald, Taylor Goforth, Erik Fisher, mariposa lily, John Sterling

in the 0, top to bottom, right to left: caterpillar, Carol Knuston, Helen Harbin, Mark Webster, Karen Garber, Lex Shapiro, Adam Marx, Fred Sawyer, Marilynne Keyser

in the 1, top to bottom, right to left: Chris Scranton, Bruce Jim, Jeff Woods, Abby and Latigo of the Paisley Youth Conservation Corps, Pete Collier

in the 8, top to bottom, right to left: youth Annual General Meeting participant, John Katzenstein, Jamey Pyles, Brittany Leffel, Mandy Bonahoom, Katy Bartzokis, Terry Butler, Elisa Cheng