Allen Taylor

success

Spring Basin Wilderness

Spring Basin Wilderness

Spring Basin Wilderness

With 10,000 acres of undulating terrain, secluded canyons and spectacular vantages of the John Day Country, Spring Basin is magnificent to explore This public treasure, forever protected as Wilderness, offers a profusion of desert wildflowers in the spring and year-round recreational opportunities for hikers, horseback

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voices

Tim Neville, journalist

Tim Neville, journalist

“Oregon’s Owyhee reminds me a lot of Southern Utah’s red rock country… only dipped in fudge.”

fact

Bitteroot

Bitteroot

Bitteroot blooms on north-facing cliffs in western North America.

The Paiute name for bitteroot is kangedya. Traditional Native American uses of the plant included eating the roots, mixed with berries and meat, and using the roots to treat sore throats.

 

Repairing beaver dam analogs in the Malheur National Forest

Collecting native seeds at Denny Jones Ranch

Gena Goodman-Campbell

Working along Camp Creek

Juniper cutting at Denny Jones Ranch

The 2022 Tribal Stewards started their season with two weeks of invasive vegetation removal on the coast, before heading across the mountains to visit the ONDA office in Bend and get prepped for the wonders and challenges of working in the desert. The crew continued east to their first project with the Prairie City Ranger District of the Malheur National Forest, working to protect the headwater springs of the Malheur and North Fork Malheur Rivers. They built wildlife-friendly fences that will protect these important water sources from cattle damage and got snowed on while camping at over 5,000 feet!

The crew then headed down to the Burns Paiute Tribe’s Denny Jones conservation property to restore upland sagebrush habitat through cutting encroaching juniper and collecting native seed that will be grown out for future upland plantings.

In the coming weeks, the Tribal Stewards will work on beaver dam analog maintenance, riparian plantings, fish surveys and invasive fish species removal, and trail work at various locations including Burns Paiute Tribe conservation properties, John Day Fossil Beds National Monument and the Malheur National Forest. The crew is looking forward to seeing more areas of Oregon and gaining experience on a variety of projects. Follow along with the crew this season by visiting the photo gallery.

2022 Tribal Stewards hit the desert

Author: Beth Macinko  |  Published: July 1, 2022  |  Category: Profile The 2022 Tribal Stewards crew is in the desert! For a third summer, a motivated group of Indigenous young […]

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“A diverse and magical place”

Tribal Stewards reflect on the 2021 season In early July, we introduced you to the 2021 Tribal Stewards crew. Now that they have wrapped up their five-week session of restoration […]

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Meet the 2021 Tribal Stewards Crew

This summer, a determined crew of Indigenous young adults is gaining professional experience in conservation, restoration and natural resource management, as our second season of the Tribal Stewards initiative, run […]

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Helping Fish, Addressing Fire and Drought

Author: Beth Macinko  |  Published: June 21, 2021  |  Categories: Look Back, Notes from the Field ONDA volunteers plant thousands of willow and repair fences in the Malheur watershed The […]

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2020 Conservationist of the Year

Scott Bowler When we reached Scott to let him know that we wanted to acknowledge him as ONDA’s 2020 Conservationist of the Year, he was out on a hike along […]

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What Can I Do?

Last Updated: April 14, 2020 It’s mid-April 2020 and we are seeing a positive response to Governor Brown’s stay at home order that is helping to keep COVID-19 cases at […]

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