FAQS

Jeremy Fox

voices

Ryan “Dirtmonger” Sylva, ODT thru-hiker 2017

Ryan “Dirtmonger” Sylva, ODT thru-hiker 2017

“To me, it’s a thru-hike in an isolated place that promotes a conversation in land management, ethics and usage. Hiking across a vast and remote landscape and having a random and chance encounter with cowboys and hunters to discuss how ‘all of us’ should treat the land, how we all have a responsibility, no matter our political leanings, really showed me the pulse of the people in rural areas, especially here out west.”

listen

Western Meadowlark Dawn Chorus

Western Meadowlark Dawn Chorus

voices

John Cunningham, ONDA member and volunteer

John Cunningham, ONDA member and volunteer

Restoration is hard slow work. It takes hold, or it doesn’t, in fits and starts. The immensity of the need can be discouraging, but we must carry on. I am so thankful ONDA carries on.

The current route is 751.7 miles

  • 10% Trail
  • 35% Cross country
  • 50% Unpaved/dirt roads
  • 5% paved roads
  • The route is unmarked
  • The driest section of the ODT is between Bend and Paisley, the first 160 miles
  • The longest water carry depends on the season, could be about 40 miles, often much less
  • Spring and fall are the ideal times to hike
  • The ODT ties into two National Recreation Trails: The Fremont National Recreation Trail & Desert Trail
  • The Desert Trail is also a “trail that’s not a trail.” The ODT ties into this existing route system for 75 miles from South Stens Campground on the western side of Steens Mountain, to the southern edge of the Pueblo Mountains in Oregon. (ODT Sections 14-16)
  • The ODT shares a 50.4-mile section of the Fremont National Recreation Trail with long-distance bikepacking route the Oregon Timber Trail
  • 16 different towns and cities along the route can provide hiker services
  • Multi-sport information has been developed for bikes, equestrians, boats and skis/snowshoes
  • The highest point on the trail is 9,552’ in the Steens Mountain
  • The lowest point on the trail is 2,655 at Lake Owyhee State Park

Renee Patrick

Community

Connect with other hikers, share your trip reports, explore the trail towns along the route, or plan to attend a future trail presentation. As we build our network of supporters and hikers, we would love to involve you as much as possible. Do you have a service you would like to offer hikers along...

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Sarah Imholt

Get Involved in the Oregon Desert Trail

The Oregon Desert Trail exists thanks to thousands of volunteer and staff hours and generous support in the form of memberships and donations. You can help shape the future of the route by joining ONDA, volunteering for trail work, attending a presentation, or becoming a sponsor of the trail. We want to hear what...

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Renee Patrick

Plan A Trip

  To make planning easier, ONDA divided the full 750-mile trail route into four regions and a total of 25 sections of 20 to 40 miles each, all of varying difficulty. Be advised! It is critical to read the guide descriptions in detail and seriously consider any notes on water scarcity or challenging terrain...

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