Protecting Native Fish and Wildlife

Devlin Holloway

Many people do not realize that deserts are full of life. Oregon’s high desert supports a remarkable diversity of plants and animals, including many unique and endangered species.

voices

Sarah Graham, Sage Sustainers Member

Sarah Graham, Sage Sustainers Member

“I contribute to ONDA monthly because it adds up to a larger annual gift than what I’d be able to comfortably afford if I were to do a simple one-time donation annually. I’m able to give more to ONDA this way and have greater impact which is important to me, and my dog Polly.”

listen

Western Meadowlark Dawn Chorus

Western Meadowlark Dawn Chorus

fact

Swallowtail

Swallowtail

The Oregon Swallowtail butterfly is the official state insect of Oregon and a true native of the Pacific Northwest. The Swallowtail can be seen in the lower sagebrush canyons of the Columbia River and its tributaries, including the Snake River drainage area.  Source: State Symbols USA

Latin name: Papilio oregonius

The Greater sage-grouse, pygmy rabbit, sage thrasher, and pronghorn antelope all thrive in a healthy sagebrush steppe ecosystem. Eastern Oregon’s lakes, rivers, and streams attract tens of thousands of migrating birds, including sandhill cranes, pelicans, and tundra swans, while native fish, such as chinook salmon, steelhead, and redband and bull trout flourish in Oregon’s desert rivers.

These fragile desert lands and rivers are threatened by changes in climate, improper livestock grazing, off-road vehicle use, mining, and road building. Loss of habitat and other human activities have pushed many of these desert species toward extinction.

Each of ONDA’s primary programs works to ensure that these fragile species and the ecosystems that they depend on for survival are protected and home to healthy and diverse populations of fish and wildlife.

Devlin Holloway

Devlin Holloway

Devlin Holloway

Devlin Holloway