Protecting Native Fish and Wildlife

Devlin Holloway

Many people do not realize that deserts are full of life. Oregon’s high desert supports a remarkable diversity of plants and animals, including many unique and endangered species.

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Jeremy Fox on Steens Landscape

Jeremy Fox on Steens Landscape

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Spring Basin Wilderness

Spring Basin Wilderness

Spring Basin Wilderness

With 10,000 acres of undulating terrain, secluded canyons and spectacular vantages of the John Day Country, Spring Basin is magnificent to explore This public treasure, forever protected as Wilderness, offers a profusion of desert wildflowers in the spring and year-round recreational opportunities for hikers, horseback

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Volunteer Accomplishment in Hart-Sheldon

Volunteer Accomplishment in Hart-Sheldon

The Greater sage-grouse, pygmy rabbit, sage thrasher, and pronghorn antelope all thrive in a healthy sagebrush steppe ecosystem. Eastern Oregon’s lakes, rivers, and streams attract tens of thousands of migrating birds, including sandhill cranes, pelicans, and tundra swans, while native fish, such as chinook salmon, steelhead, and redband and bull trout flourish in Oregon’s desert rivers.

These fragile desert lands and rivers are threatened by changes in climate, improper livestock grazing, off-road vehicle use, mining, and road building. Loss of habitat and other human activities have pushed many of these desert species toward extinction.

Each of ONDA’s primary programs works to ensure that these fragile species and the ecosystems that they depend on for survival are protected and home to healthy and diverse populations of fish and wildlife.

Devlin Holloway

Devlin Holloway

Devlin Holloway

Devlin Holloway