Thank Oregon’s Senators for Protecting Desert Rivers

On February 3, 2021, Oregon’s Senators introduced the River Democracy Act, which would protect hundreds of miles of Wild and Scenic Rivers in Oregon’s High Desert, from Whychus Creek to the Owyhee! This momentous bill grew out of a public nomination process led by Senator Wyden that resulted in over 15,000 nominations for rivers, creeks and lakes to be protected as Wild and Scenic.

Please edit the message below to include your favorite rivers and creeks in Oregon’s high desert.

voices

Bonnie Olin, 2017 Volunteer of the Year

Bonnie Olin, 2017 Volunteer of the Year

“If you spend enough time in the wild, it will change you. So it was for me in Oregon’s high desert, especially in the Owyhee Canyonlands.” To support ONDA, Bonnie says, is to strive to protect the very values of Oregon’s high desert that are critical to the human experience: quiet and connectedness with nature. “Oregon’s desert,” she says, “broadens your understanding of your relationship to all living things.”

fact

Swallowtail

Swallowtail

The Oregon Swallowtail butterfly is the official state insect of Oregon and a true native of the Pacific Northwest. The Swallowtail can be seen in the lower sagebrush canyons of the Columbia River and its tributaries, including the Snake River drainage area.  Source: State Symbols USA

Latin name: Papilio oregonius

fact

Badger

Badger

Badgers are generally nocturnal, but, in remote areas with no human encroachment, they are routinely observed foraging during the day. They prefer open areas with grasslands, which can include parklands, farms, and treeless areas with crumbly soil and a supply of rodent prey.

Badgers are born blind, furred, and helpless. Their eyes open at four to six weeks.

Latin name: Taxidea taxus