Tell Sen. Wyden & Rep. Blumenauer: It’s time to protect Oregon’s High Desert public lands!

Jim Davis

This month, Senator Wyden and Rep. Blumenauer are holding a Public Lands Forum: ‘What’s next for federal public land protections in Oregon?

Sending a strong answer to this question is a critical moment that could dramatically change the number of protected public lands throughout Oregon’s high desert. As a passionate, steadfast advocate for Oregon’s public lands, please raise your voice on behalf of our high desert lands, waters and wildlife.

Take action to let Senator Wyden and Representative Blumenauer know that you care about Oregon’s high desert public lands and that places like the Owyhee Canyonlands, Whychus-Deschutes and Sutton Mountain need protection now!

fact

What defines Oregon’s high desert?

What defines Oregon’s high desert?

Bounded by the Cascade Mountains to the west and the Blue Mountains to the north, Oregon’s high desert covers approximately 24,000 square miles. Annual rainfall in the high desert varies from 5 to 14 inches. The average elevation is 4,000 feet; at 9,733 feet, the summit of Steens Mountain is the highest point in Oregon’s high desert. The terrain of the high desert was mostly formed by a series of lava flows that occurred between 30 and 10 million years ago.

Sources: The Oregon Encyclopedia; Wikipedia  

watch

Julie Weikel on Wilderness

Julie Weikel on Wilderness

voices

Cregg Large, member since 2009

Cregg Large, member since 2009

“I came to Oregon 12 years ago from Texas. Texas, for all its size, has very little public land. Coming to Oregon has made me realize the special gift we as Americans have in our public lands. Volunteering with an organization like ONDA is my way of reciprocating for this gift. Through restoration efforts, I feel we are helping leave a better place than we found it. Through advocating for protection for public lands, we safeguard migration routes for animals and keep the land where it belongs: with the public.”