Protect Desert Rivers

Give to conserve free-flowing rivers, today

Bryan Andresen

Senator Ron Wyden is looking to add more Wild & Scenic Rivers to Oregon’s legacy of protected waterways and you have the chance to conserve 825 miles of desert rivers with your gift today.  Stand up for Whychus Creek, the Chewaucan River, and the North Fork John Day River. Stand up for free-flowing streams, resilient in the face of climate change, which allow for thriving wildlife habitat and boundless recreation opportunities. Stand up to amplify the voices of thousands of advocates who want to see these places protected, forever.


Protect 825 miles of desert rivers with your gift

All gifts made on August 31st will be matched!


WHYCHUS CREEK

Your gift today will conserve 10 miles of Whychus Creek, which will conserve cultural sites from generations of habitation, as Whychus Creek is a gathering place for Indigenous Chinookan, Sahaptin, Northern Paiute and Molala peoples.

 


CHEWAUCAN RIVER

Your donation today will also protect 23 miles of the Chewaucan River, home to wild redband trout, mule deer, American pika and birds including migratory Olive-sided Flycatchers and year-round Lewis’ Woodpecker.

 


NORTH FORK JOHN DAY RIVER

Your gift will also protect 40 miles of the North Fork John Day River, described by the Bureau of Land Management as flowing through, “some of the finest scenery in Oregon.”

 

 


These rivers and many others across Oregon’s high desert will be protected in legislation this year, with your support. Thank you for standing up for the unique cultural, fish and wildlife, and scenic values of desert rivers.

success

Central Oregon’s “Backyard Wilderness”

Central Oregon’s “Backyard Wilderness”

Our quest to protect the Oregon Badlands

Located just 15 miles east of Bend, Oregon Badlands is a 30,000-acre wilderness area filled with fascinating lava flows and ancient juniper trees Arriving in the Badlands, so named for its rugged and harsh terrain, can feel like stepping

Read More

fact

Young Horny Toad Lizard

Young Horny Toad Lizard

In the summer these lizards begin foraging for food as soon as their body temperature rises as the heat of the day increases. They feed on slow-moving, ground-dwelling insects. In the fall they hibernate by burying themselves in the sand.

Latin name: Phrysonoma platyrhinos

listen

South Fork Crooked River and Birds

South Fork Crooked River and Birds