Get Involved

ONDA

watch

Helen Harbin on Wildlife

Helen Harbin on Wildlife

listen

Great Basin Spadefoot Toads – a sleepy chorus

Great Basin Spadefoot Toads – a sleepy chorus

fact

What defines Oregon’s high desert?

What defines Oregon’s high desert?

Bounded by the Cascade Mountains to the west and the Blue Mountains to the north, Oregon’s high desert covers approximately 24,000 square miles. Annual rainfall in the high desert varies from 5 to 14 inches. The average elevation is 4,000 feet; at 9,733 feet, the summit of Steens Mountain is the highest point in Oregon’s high desert. The terrain of the high desert was mostly formed by a series of lava flows that occurred between 30 and 10 million years ago.

Sources: The Oregon Encyclopedia; Wikipedia  

Lindsay Jones

Subscribe to Our E-News

Be the first to hear when new stewardship trips open for registration, about important comment periods on public lands issues, and ONDA events happening near you. Subscribe today.

Read More

Robert Tilley

Volunteer

Each year, hundreds of volunteers work alongside Oregon Natural Desert Association to protect and restore the public lands of Oregon’s high desert. There are many different ways to pitch in and help. You could restore streams, improve trails, mail thank you letters, attend meetings, welcome people at ONDA events and much more. Your skills and...

Read More

Jeremy Austin

Take Action

Speak up for Oregon’s high desert. Every one of us must be an advocate for the lands and wildlife we love or risk losing them forever. Take action today to help protect Oregon’s high desert for the future!

Read More

Chuck Gates

Join, Renew, or Give a Gift

Thank you for conserving the lands, waterways, and wildlife in Oregon’s high desert!

Read More