Central Oregon Backcountry

Greg Burke   Website

voices

Cregg Large, member since 2009

Cregg Large, member since 2009

“I came to Oregon 12 years ago from Texas. Texas, for all its size, has very little public land. Coming to Oregon has made me realize the special gift we as Americans have in our public lands. Volunteering with an organization like ONDA is my way of reciprocating for this gift. Through restoration efforts, I feel we are helping leave a better place than we found it. Through advocating for protection for public lands, we safeguard migration routes for animals and keep the land where it belongs: with the public.”

fact

Swallowtail

Swallowtail

The Oregon Swallowtail butterfly is the official state insect of Oregon and a true native of the Pacific Northwest. The Swallowtail can be seen in the lower sagebrush canyons of the Columbia River and its tributaries, including the Snake River drainage area.  Source: State Symbols USA

Latin name: Papilio oregonius

fact

Young Horny Toad Lizard

Young Horny Toad Lizard

In the summer these lizards begin foraging for food as soon as their body temperature rises as the heat of the day increases. They feed on slow-moving, ground-dwelling insects. In the fall they hibernate by burying themselves in the sand.

Latin name: Phrysonoma platyrhinos

A Wild Backyard

Rugged river canyons, ancient juniper woodlands, and rolling grasslands make the Central Oregon Backcountry some of Oregon’s most beloved public lands. Wild places like the Oregon Badlands Wilderness and Whychus-Deschutes provide boundless opportunities for exploration and adventure, all just minutes away from the people who live and work in Central Oregon.  

Enjoying Central Oregon's desert backcountry

Tyler Roemer   Website

Flyfishing the Middle Deschutes River

Brian O'Keefe   Website

Ancient juniper in the Oregon Badlands Wilderness

Greg Burke   Website

Alder Springs Trail

Greg Burke   Website

Lava formations of the Oregon Badlands Wilderness

Greg Burke   Website

Central Oregon’s backcountry holds features found nowhere else: junipers that are among the oldest trees in Oregon, Native American rock art and artifacts that tell the history of this region, and some of the last wild habitat for animals like golden eagles and steelhead. These irreplaceable treasures need and deserve protection.

Whychus-Deschutes

Within an hour’s drive from Bend and just west of Terrebonne, the rugged canyons of Whychus-Deschutes remain astonishingly wild.

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Our Favorite Places in the Central Oregon Backcountry

Working for the Central Oregon Backcountry

A growing population and an influx of visitors are presenting new challenges to our lands. ONDA works to protect places like Whychus-Deschutes for the future by engaging the community and encouraging people to speak up for the places they love.