Financials

Greg Burke   Website

Our work to protect and restore Oregon’s high desert public lands is fueled by the generosity of our members.

fact

What defines Oregon’s high desert?

What defines Oregon’s high desert?

Bounded by the Cascade Mountains to the west and the Blue Mountains to the north, Oregon’s high desert covers approximately 24,000 square miles. Annual rainfall in the high desert varies from 5 to 14 inches. The average elevation is 4,000 feet; at 9,733 feet, the summit of Steens Mountain is the highest point in Oregon’s high desert. The terrain of the high desert was mostly formed by a series of lava flows that occurred between 30 and 10 million years ago.

Sources: The Oregon Encyclopedia; Wikipedia  

watch

Tibetan Monks Visit Sutton Mountain

Tibetan Monks Visit Sutton Mountain

voices

Durlin Hicock, Alice Elshoff Award winner

Durlin Hicock, Alice Elshoff Award winner

“Protecting public land is part of my spiritual being. It’s central to my identity to be in wilderness and to see it protected.” Durlin is proud to protect public lands for future generations, saying, “The highlight of my childhood was our family’s weekend outdoor trips. I look forward to my grandchildren having similar experiences outside in their lifetimes, and it wouldn’t be possible without ONDA.”

Every donation, advocacy action, and volunteer hour adds up to an incredible investment in a healthy, promising future for Oregon’s desert landscapes, waterways, and wildlife. Please review Oregon Natural Desert Association’s recent financial information for insight into the scope of your giving and the essential programs these contributions support.

Read our Vision, Mission, and Beliefs.

Donor Spotlight: Helen Harbin

You’re sure to see Helen Harbin smiling and mingling at ONDA events and volunteer trips.

Helen has long devoted her immense talent by serving on ONDA’s board -- including seven years as board chair -- using her corporate experience to better the organization. She’s also always ready to lend a hand, whether pulling fence in the field or going on film as one of the Sagebrush Sisters. We can’t thank Helen enough for her devoting her dedication and know-how to the high desert.


“I believe we will protect the Owyhee Canyonlands ...

ONDA has always persevered, and I think that's what will carry the day. In the meantime, I hope to protect this striking place from degradation until we win final permanent protection.”- David Johns