Only You Can Prevent
Sagebrush Fires

success

Central Oregon’s “Backyard Wilderness”

Central Oregon’s “Backyard Wilderness”

Our quest to protect the Oregon Badlands

Located just 15 miles east of Bend, Oregon Badlands is a 30,000-acre wilderness area filled with fascinating lava flows and ancient juniper trees Arriving in the Badlands, so named for its rugged and harsh terrain, can feel like stepping

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fact

Swallowtail

Swallowtail

The Oregon Swallowtail butterfly is the official state insect of Oregon and a true native of the Pacific Northwest. The Swallowtail can be seen in the lower sagebrush canyons of the Columbia River and its tributaries, including the Snake River drainage area.  Source: State Symbols USA

Latin name: Papilio oregonius

fact

Young Horny Toad Lizard

Young Horny Toad Lizard

In the summer these lizards begin foraging for food as soon as their body temperature rises as the heat of the day increases. They feed on slow-moving, ground-dwelling insects. In the fall they hibernate by burying themselves in the sand.

Latin name: Phrysonoma platyrhinos

With fire season approaching in Oregon’s high desert, here are three regulations to know and follow:
  1. All motorists should have required fire prevention equipment in their vehicle to ensure fire prevention and personal safety. With the exception of traveling on state and county roads, you are required to have: an axe, a shovel, and one gallon of water and/or one 2.5 pound or larger fire extinguisher.
  2. Smoking in wildland areas is permitted only in enclosed vehicles on roads.
  3. Open fires, including campfires, charcoal fires, cooking fires and warming fires, are permitted only at posted and designated sites.
  • “Axe” means a wood cutting tool having a handle of not less than 26 inches in length and a head weight of not less than 2 pounds.
  • “Shovel” means a digging tool having a handle not less than 26 inches in length and a blade of not less than 8 inches in width. 

Know what is required by the BLM: https://www.blm.gov/programs/public-safety-and-fire/fire-and-aviation/get-involved/fire-prevention

And, here’s a bit more advice to keep in mind for a safe and enjoyable desert trip:
  • Avoid driving on roads where you see plants growing in the roadbed because they could catch fire after contacting your tailpipe or other hot parts of your vehicle.
  • Park only in areas where grasses and other vegetation will not be in contact with your vehicle.
  • Regularly check the undercarriage of your vehicle for debris or other flammable materials.
  • If you notice that your vehicle has come to a stop above flammable plant material, douse the area with water.
  • Know the fire risk of the areas you are traveling in

Find the latest conditions and restrictions: https://www.blm.gov/programs/public-safety-and-fire/fire-and-aviation/regional-info/oregon-washington/fire-restrictions

 

Only You Can Prevent
Sagebrush Fires

You might think of forests when you think “wildfire,” but, as OPB reported in May, nearly 75 percent of all acres burned in the west over the past two decades were on rangelands — not forest. As someone who lives in or visits sagebrush country, you have an important responsibility to help prevent human-caused...

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Volunteer Opportunity: First Friday tabling at Patagonia @ Bend

Join ONDA for First Friday at Patagonia @ Bend on July 5! We’ll be sharing information about our conservation and restoration initiatives and connecting interested folks with our work, all while enjoying cold drinks in a fun community atmosphere.  Volunteers will set up at 5 p.m. and break down at 7:30 p.m. Email Caelin@onda.org...

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Volunteer Opportunity: Wildflower Show and Pollinator Festival

Join ONDA on Saturday, July 6 at the Sunriver Nature Center for the 2019 Wildflower Show and Pollinator Festival! Volunteers will share information about ONDA’s restoration and conservation initiatives, set up and break down the ONDA table and connect community members with our work. View hundreds of native wildflowers, a honeybee hive demonstration, local...

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Desert Wilderness Retrospective

A Tale of Two Wilderness Areas: Badlands and Spring Basin On March 30, 2009, President Obama signed a massive public lands package into law, with the Oregon Badlands Wilderness and Spring Basin Wilderness among the many places protected. Besides sharing the same birthday and being located in Oregon’s high desert, the Badlands and Spring...

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Dark Desert Skies

For those of us who have spent time in Oregon’s high desert, there is no need to explain how truly dark skies showcase the wonders of the stars viewable by the naked eye. Night skies relatively free from light pollution — that is, human-created artificial lighting and atmospheric disturbances such as smog — will...

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Badlands Challenge

To honor the tenth anniversary of Oregon Badlands Wilderness designation, ONDA is hosting a six-month long exploration challenge. 30,000 acres of fascinating lava flows and ancient juniper trees await you, all just 15 miles east of Bend, Oregon. Arriving in the Badlands, so named for its rugged and harsh terrain, can feel like stepping...

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Badlands Bash

Join ONDA and the Friends of Oregon Badlands Wilderness at FootZone Bend to celebrate the tenth anniversary of the Oregon Badlands Wilderness. On March 30, 2009, President Obama signed a massive public lands package that protected the Oregon Badlands Wilderness, Spring Basin Wilderness, and many more. Come raise a glass to high desert wilderness...

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South Fork WSA Fence Build #2

Backpacking to a remote location and building fence to protect riparian habitat.

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South Fork WSA Fence Build #1

On the first of several trips slated for this area over the next few years, we will backpack out to a piece of privately owned land within the South Fork Crooked River Wilderness Study Area (WSA) to build a challenging, but important, fence around 80 acres on the river. This fence will accomplish many...

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Willow Creek Planting (Day Trip)

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