“A diverse and magical place”

Beth Macinko

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Stewardship Fence Building Timelapse

Stewardship Fence Building Timelapse

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Durlin Hicock, Alice Elshoff Award winner

Durlin Hicock, Alice Elshoff Award winner

“Protecting public land is part of my spiritual being. It’s central to my identity to be in wilderness and to see it protected.” Durlin is proud to protect public lands for future generations, saying, “The highlight of my childhood was our family’s weekend outdoor trips. I look forward to my grandchildren having similar experiences outside in their lifetimes, and it wouldn’t be possible without ONDA.”

voices

Helen Harbin, ONDA Board Member

Helen Harbin, ONDA Board Member

“I connect with Oregon’s high desert through my feet, my eyes, my sense of smell, and all the things I hear. Getting out there is a whole body experience.” Supporting ONDA, Helen says, not only connects her with wild landscapes, but is also a good investment. “I felt like if I gave them $20, they might squeeze $23 out of it.”

The crew and Forest Service staff in front of the newly completed fence along Little Crane Creek

 

Looking back on their season, the crew found some of the most physically challenging projects were the ones they were proudest of, including:

  • Hiking rugged terrain during the June heat wave to remove juniper from 170 acres, restoring open sagebrush habitat for greater sage-grouse.
  • Maintaining beaver dam analogs to promote continued riparian restoration along Camp Creek.
  • Learning to fly fish to catch and remove invasive brook trout from the Strawberry Mountains.
  • Building over 500 feet of wooden buck and pole fence (in just two days!) and repairing wire fence to protect critical bull trout habitat.

In addition to the sense of accomplishment at completing work projects, the crew was also proud of the community they were able to build with each other. The crew laughed together at falling in beaver holes along stream banks, shared fun times catching invasive crayfish for dinner and swimming in Magone Lake, and supported each other through challenges.

Fishing for invasive brook trout at High Lake

 

Seeing parts of Oregon they hadn’t been to before was yet another highlight of the program. When asked how they’d describe the desert, the crew gushed:

“A diverse and magical place.”

“Some of the best sunrises in the world.”

“The beautiful wildflowers.”

“Fast-flowing rivers running through it like veins to feed the forests and desert.”

“Seeing the stars clearly.”

“Full of bugs and animals and birds.”

“HOT!!”

The crew gained more experience in fields they were already familiar with, like fisheries and range fence work, and were introduced to new fields, like paleontology and wildlife biology. Seeing the day-to-day work of different conservation careers helped members see pathways they may be interested in exploring later on.

We’re grateful to Duane, Audie, Mo, Wes, Cam, Parish, and Diamond for taking part in the Tribal Stewards program this year. While this desert-focused session is over, most of this Tribal Stewards crew is continuing on to a second session of projects along the Columbia River Gorge and we wish them a successful rest of their season!

Beth Macinko

Conducting fish surveys with Burns Paiute Tribe along Lake Creek

“A diverse and magical place”

Tribal Stewards reflect on the 2021 season In early July, we introduced you to the 2021 Tribal Stewards crew. Now that they have wrapped up their five-week session of restoration and conservation projects on Oregon’s desert lands and adjacent watersheds, we wanted to share their accomplishments and highlights from the season. After starting their...

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Helping Fish, Addressing Fire and Drought

Author: Beth Macinko  |  Published: June 21, 2021  |  Categories: Look Back, Notes from the Field ONDA volunteers plant thousands of willow and repair fences in the Malheur watershed The native bull trout and redband trout in the Malheur River drainage, located south of Prairie City in the Malheur National Forest, can look forward...

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Before and After Stewardship

The difference that ONDA volunteers can make in just a few hours or days of working together is pretty incredible. Here are a few before and after pictures to give you a taste and you’ll find even more photos in our post-trip photo albums. As we return to project locations season after season and...

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Trip of a Lifetime

ONDA member Robin Kaai recently took part in a stewardship trip in the John Day River Basin. Here she offers you her recap. Dear fellow ONDA members, When registration for ONDA’s John Day River fence pull trip opened in February, I responded immediately … but this popular trip fills quickly. Waitlisted! Luckily for me, within...

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Giving Wild Animals Freedom to Roam

Volunteers remove obsolete fence from more than 90,000 acres in the Steens Mountain Wilderness The 97,229 acre cow-free portion of the Steens Mountain Wilderness Area in southeastern Oregon is now completely free of obsolete barbed wire fence, thanks to the work of Oregon Natural Desert Association (ONDA) volunteers who removed the last two miles...

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Service at Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge

Carol Savonen is a member of Great Old Broads for Wilderness, a group formed initially by older women to champion America’s public lands. Here, she shares the experience the Broads had on a recent trip to the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge. This past June, 25 Oregon members of the Great Old Broads for...

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