The Essential Pronghorn Corridor in the Greater Hart-Sheldon

Devlin Holloway

The Greater Hart-Sheldon region straddles the Oregon-Nevada border and provides essential habitat for pronghorn, as well as hundreds of other sagebrush-dependent plants and animals. In 2016, the region supported more than 8,000 pronghorn. However, populations have declined since then, with the most recent count at 4,313 animals in 2019.

As Sheldon-Hart Mountain National Wildlife Refuge Complex refuge manager Shannon Ludwig explained, in the article Removing the tangled legacy of barbed wire, “Fences clearly can disrupt migration corridors for wildlife, especially larger ungulate wildlife, with how the fences are designed. Deer like to jump over fences, and pronghorn and bighorn sheep like to go under the fences.”

As information newly published by the U.S. Geological Survey highlights, this landscape is critically important to the future of North America’s “prairie ghost.” ONDA used this GIS data to create the map below, which highlights how much of the migration corridor lacks a strong protective status and how many miles of fencing still cross this corridor.

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Aaron Tani, Sage Society Member

Aaron Tani, Sage Society Member

“It feels good to support ONDA on a monthly basis, because I know they never stop supporting our public lands. ONDA works to help make our lands a better place for the future, and I feel like I’m a part of that every month with my support.”

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Volunteer Accomplishment in Hart-Sheldon

Volunteer Accomplishment in Hart-Sheldon

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The Land Between: The Greater Hart-Sheldon Region

The Land Between: The Greater Hart-Sheldon Region