Fall Planting Trips

Author: Gena Goodman-Campbell  |  Published: October 3, 2022  |  Category:  Coming Up

Desert streams and rivers are the lifeblood of Oregon’s high desert, but many of these essential riparian areas have been negatively impacted from over a century of grazing and other agricultural uses. A healthy streambank looks like a lush thicket with trees and shrubs providing shade for the stream. Lacking the streamside trees and shrubs, degraded streams are often too warm to support native fish and wildlife, and are even less resilient in the face of climate change, drought and wildfire.

ONDA’s riparian restoration work focuses on using science-based planting techniques to:

  • increase biodiversity in streamside ecosystems
  • decrease stream temperatures, and
  • provide a variety of other benefits for desert fish and wildlife that depend on these oases.

Join one of our fall planting trips to help bring about the transformation of degraded desert creeks into thriving, resilient waterways.

fact

Bitteroot

Bitteroot

Bitteroot blooms on north-facing cliffs in western North America.

The Paiute name for bitteroot is kangedya. Traditional Native American uses of the plant included eating the roots, mixed with berries and meat, and using the roots to treat sore throats.

 

voices

Cregg Large, member since 2009

Cregg Large, member since 2009

“I came to Oregon 12 years ago from Texas. Texas, for all its size, has very little public land. Coming to Oregon has made me realize the special gift we as Americans have in our public lands. Volunteering with an organization like ONDA is my way of reciprocating for this gift. Through restoration efforts, I feel we are helping leave a better place than we found it. Through advocating for protection for public lands, we safeguard migration routes for animals and keep the land where it belongs: with the public.”

voices

Tim Neville, journalist

Tim Neville, journalist

“Oregon’s Owyhee reminds me a lot of Southern Utah’s red rock country… only dipped in fudge.”