Writing a Letter to the Editor

Who reads the paper? Your elected officials and your fellow concerned citizens! Getting your opinion published in your local paper can help bring important public lands issues to the attention of others in your community and your elected leaders.

voices

Michelle Frisella, member since 2017

Michelle Frisella, member since 2017

So proud of ONDA and its members and volunteers. Such hard work gets done. To use an overused word, this is patriotism!

fact

Swallowtail

Swallowtail

The Oregon Swallowtail butterfly is the official state insect of Oregon and a true native of the Pacific Northwest. The Swallowtail can be seen in the lower sagebrush canyons of the Columbia River and its tributaries, including the Snake River drainage area.  Source: State Symbols USA

Latin name: Papilio oregonius

voices

Terry Butler, 2018 Volunteer of the Year

Terry Butler, 2018 Volunteer of the Year

“If I have to pick a favorite place in Oregon’s high desert, it would be Sutton Mountain, but I’m excited about all of the Wilderness Study Areas,” says Terry, adding, “Each is a gem to explore, and I hope they all get protection someday… I love the scale of the physical beauty of the desert.”

How to write an effective letter to the editor in six simple steps:

  1. Follow the rules of the publication. Most papers limit letters to 250 words. Don’t go over your limit. Find links to the letters to the editor policies for many Oregon papers below, as well as instructions for how to submit your letter.
  2. Be concise. Choose one topic to focus on, and state your opinion clearly and briefly at the beginning of your letter, then use local examples, personal experience, or relevant facts to back it up.
  3. Keep it current. Write about something happening right now, or a topic the newspaper recently wrote about. If you’re responding to an article or editorial, mention it and the date it ran.
  4. Make a clear ask that offers a solution. What do you want the reader, the editor of the paper, or your elected leaders to do after they read your letter?
  5. Revise your letter and let it sit. If you used emotional language (words like stupid, dumb, ridiculous, silly, or expletives), take it out. When you can, wait a few hours after your write your letter, then read it again before you send it. Or, send it to a trusted friend for feedback.
  6. Send it in. Don’t let “the perfect be the enemy of the good.” Your letter does not need to be Pulitzer Prize-worthy to be effective. Take a deep breath, and press send!