Writing a Letter to the Editor

Who reads the paper? Your elected officials and your fellow concerned citizens! Getting your opinion published in your local paper can help bring important public lands issues to the attention of others in your community and your elected leaders.

voices

Scott Bowler, ONDA member from Portland

Scott Bowler, ONDA member from Portland

The desert speaks for itself, but very softly. I support ONDA to promote and enable discovery of the amazing beauty and recreational opportunities of the high desert by much broader groups of people; and most especially to protect forever the full and diverse landscape of the Owyhee Canyonlands, a place without parallel or equal in our country.”

watch

Tibetan Monks Visit Sutton Mountain

Tibetan Monks Visit Sutton Mountain

voices

Helen Harbin, ONDA Board Member

Helen Harbin, ONDA Board Member

“I connect with Oregon’s high desert through my feet, my eyes, my sense of smell, and all the things I hear. Getting out there is a whole body experience.” Supporting ONDA, Helen says, not only connects her with wild landscapes, but is also a good investment. “I felt like if I gave them $20, they might squeeze $23 out of it.”

How to write an effective letter to the editor in six simple steps:

  1. Follow the rules of the publication. Most papers limit letters to 250 words. Don’t go over your limit. Find links to the letters to the editor policies for many Oregon papers below, as well as instructions for how to submit your letter.
  2. Be concise. Choose one topic to focus on, and state your opinion clearly and briefly at the beginning of your letter, then use local examples, personal experience, or relevant facts to back it up.
  3. Keep it current. Write about something happening right now, or a topic the newspaper recently wrote about. If you’re responding to an article or editorial, mention it and the date it ran.
  4. Make a clear ask that offers a solution. What do you want the reader, the editor of the paper, or your elected leaders to do after they read your letter?
  5. Revise your letter and let it sit. If you used emotional language (words like stupid, dumb, ridiculous, silly, or expletives), take it out. When you can, wait a few hours after your write your letter, then read it again before you send it. Or, send it to a trusted friend for feedback.
  6. Send it in. Don’t let “the perfect be the enemy of the good.” Your letter does not need to be Pulitzer Prize-worthy to be effective. Take a deep breath, and press send!

Letter Submission Policies – Select Oregon Newspapers:

  • For the Willamette Weekly: Letters to the editor must include the author’s street address and phone number for verification. Letters must be 250 or fewer words. Submit to: 2220 NW Quimby St., Portland, OR 97210 or, email: mzusman@wweek.com

Letter Submission Policies – Select National Outlets:

Letter Submission Policies – Select Regional Outlets: