Anti-Public Lands Activist
Now Running BLM

Alan Majchrowicz   Website

The Bureau of Land Management’s new acting director, William Perry Pendley, is a longtime proponent of selling off public lands and waters

The Trump administration’s move to appoint William Perry Pendley to the top policy position at the Bureau of Land Management comes as yet another blow in its continued assault on public lands.

As Time, The Washington Post and The New York Times have reported, Pendley is a longtime and outspoken advocate for selling public lands. When he assumed the role of acting director of the BLM on Monday, July 29, the announcement caused widespread alarm across the conservation community, particularly in Western states. In Oregon, the agency manages 13.5 million acres, mainly in the high desert.

ONDA Executive Director Ryan Houston had this to say:

“From our perspective, as an organization dedicated to preserving and restoring the sagebrush steppe ecosystem, having a Bundy sympathizer and a Sagebrush Rebellion proponent at the helm of the BLM could not be more concerning.Pendley’s views are completely out of line with the majority of Americans who want public lands to stay in public hands and to be protected for the future. These are the constituents that the Interior Department should be listening to.

Thousands of knowledgeable people who know and love the landscapes they manage work for the BLM. But this administration is skipping over these people who have worked for the BLM for their entire careers and instead appointing someone who has relentlessly attacked the very notion of public lands.

It’s really appalling to see Interior deny the accusations that they are aiming to dismantle America’s prized legacy of public lands. If you’re not looking to sell off our public lands, then we can give you a long list of better choices to head up this agency.

This is 100% partisan cronyism. Putting William Perry Pendley in charge of 248 million acres of public land nationwide is, as other conservation and sportsmen groups have already noted, asking the fox to guard the hen house.”

fact

What defines Oregon’s high desert?

What defines Oregon’s high desert?

Bounded by the Cascade Mountains to the west and the Blue Mountains to the north, Oregon’s high desert covers approximately 24,000 square miles. Annual rainfall in the high desert varies from 5 to 14 inches. The average elevation is 4,000 feet; at 9,733 feet, the summit of Steens Mountain is the highest point in Oregon’s high desert. The terrain of the high desert was mostly formed by a series of lava flows that occurred between 30 and 10 million years ago.

Sources: The Oregon Encyclopedia; Wikipedia  

fact

Badger

Badger

Badgers are generally nocturnal, but, in remote areas with no human encroachment, they are routinely observed foraging during the day. They prefer open areas with grasslands, which can include parklands, farms, and treeless areas with crumbly soil and a supply of rodent prey.

Badgers are born blind, furred, and helpless. Their eyes open at four to six weeks.

Latin name: Taxidea taxus

watch

Stewardship Fence Building Timelapse

Stewardship Fence Building Timelapse

Pendley has previously served as the president of the conservative law firm Mountain States Legal Foundation and as an appointee in President Ronald Reagan’s Interior Department under James Watt.