Group Volunteer Opportunities

ONDA

Is your school or community group, hiking club, or business interested in volunteering with ONDA?

Fill out the interest form below to let us know a little more about your group and what type of project you are interested in. Please note: we work across Oregon’s high desert on a limited number of restoration projects each year and plan our work well in advance. Projects that meet your group’s needs may take several months to line up with our restoration schedule. Six to 12 months notice is ideal.

Our stewardship projects occur across eastern Oregon and focus on river and stream (riparian) restoration, uplands sagebrush restoration, wildlands monitoring and trail maintenance. Learn more about the areas we work and the types of restoration projects we do. We have several models for stewardship projects:

  • Independent Stewards projects: Your group takes on an independent project assignment, ranging from wildlands monitoring to adopting a section of trail to maintain. We’ll provide all the details and materials you’ll need to complete the project, you organize your group and go out to the field on your schedule within the project timeframe.
  • Onsite trips for community groups: We’ll work with you to determine if one of our planned restoration projects is a good match for your group’s interests and availability. You’ll organize the participants and coordinate transportation logistics and ONDA stewardship staff will meet you on site to provide tools and training for a work day in the field. These trips will return in 2022 and advance notice helps us plan, so please fill out the form below if you’re interested in these in the future.
  • Custom one day or multiday trips for businesses: If you want a custom trip built around your business’s interests and schedule, consider becoming a business member. Visit our Business Members page to learn more. Business members support critical conservation and restoration efforts across Oregon’s high desert, providing essential habitat for fish and wildlife and wild places for all people to treasure and explore, now and always. These trips require advance planning and will be available again in 2022, so please let us know now if you’re interested.

fact

Bitteroot

Bitteroot

Bitteroot blooms on north-facing cliffs in western North America.

The Paiute name for bitteroot is kangedya. Traditional Native American uses of the plant included eating the roots, mixed with berries and meat, and using the roots to treat sore throats.

 

fact

Western Rattlesnake

Western Rattlesnake

Also known as the Great Basin Rattlesnake, these pit vipers have buff-tan coloring and small, oval blotches to blend into their arid surroundings. Small heat-sensing indentations on each side of the snake’s snout detects warm-blooded prey for better striking accuracy in the dark. Source: The Oregon Encyclopedia

Latin name: Crotalus oreganus lutosus

voices

Craig Terry, ONDA member and stewardship volunteer

Craig Terry, ONDA member and stewardship volunteer

“The people I have had the privilege to share time with each season keep me volunteering again and again. Who else but those ONDA staff leaders would make fresh coffee at dawn each morning or pack a watermelon all day to serve as a reward under a juniper in a steep canyon?” Craig, who grew up in northwestern Nevada, says ONDA connects him with places he loves and a mission he believes in. “My grandfather and his father put up wire fences for their ranching needs. Taking out barbed wire sort of completes a circle for me.”