Advancing conservation priorities

Bruce Couch   Website

Oregonians love our land, and there is a lot to love. Millions of acres of public land across Oregon’s high desert enhance our lives every day. And, these lands aren’t just ours. Public lands in Oregon are a natural legacy shared by all Americans.

Without active caretaking, we stand to lose places we cherish, but, when we speak in a unified voice, we can defend our lands and ensure a healthier future for the lands, waterways, wildlife, and Oregon communities.

voices

Karen Garber, volunteer since 2017

Karen Garber, volunteer since 2017

So glad we got to do a stewardship trip with ONDA this summer, and now I’m more inspired than ever to start hiking the Oregon Desert Trail in bits and pieces.

fact

Western Rattlesnake

Western Rattlesnake

Also known as the Great Basin Rattlesnake, these pit vipers have buff-tan coloring and small, oval blotches to blend into their arid surroundings. Small heat-sensing indentations on each side of the snake’s snout detects warm-blooded prey for better striking accuracy in the dark. Source: The Oregon Encyclopedia

Latin name: Crotalus oreganus lutosus

voices

Durlin Hicock, Alice Elshoff Award winner

Durlin Hicock, Alice Elshoff Award winner

“Protecting public land is part of my spiritual being. It’s central to my identity to be in wilderness and to see it protected.” Durlin is proud to protect public lands for future generations, saying, “The highlight of my childhood was our family’s weekend outdoor trips. I look forward to my grandchildren having similar experiences outside in their lifetimes, and it wouldn’t be possible without ONDA.”

Encouraging People to Speak Up for Public Lands

Elected and appointed leaders need to hear that protecting public lands is important to their constituents.

ONDA tracks legislative and administrative efforts,  we keep our members up-to-date on important issues and threats, and we provide prompts that help you to communicate effectively with leaders.

Whether you live in Burns, Bend, or Beaverton, you have a valuable perspective on our lands and how they enhance the lives of Oregonians every day. If you love public lands, become an advocate for them.

Building Partnerships

To ensure our conservation advocacy work is as effective as possible, ONDA builds relationships with a broad set of stakeholders, including elected officials, tribal leaders, land managers, local community members throughout Oregon, landowners, businesses, and the media.