Speak Up For Public Lands

Devin Dahlgren   Website

fact

What defines Oregon’s high desert?

What defines Oregon’s high desert?

Bounded by the Cascade Mountains to the west and the Blue Mountains to the north, Oregon’s high desert covers approximately 24,000 square miles. Annual rainfall in the high desert varies from 5 to 14 inches. The average elevation is 4,000 feet; at 9,733 feet, the summit of Steens Mountain is the highest point in Oregon’s high desert. The terrain of the high desert was mostly formed by a series of lava flows that occurred between 30 and 10 million years ago.

Sources: The Oregon Encyclopedia; Wikipedia  

watch

Tibetan Monks Visit Sutton Mountain

Tibetan Monks Visit Sutton Mountain

voices

Durlin Hicock, Alice Elshoff Award winner

Durlin Hicock, Alice Elshoff Award winner

“Protecting public land is part of my spiritual being. It’s central to my identity to be in wilderness and to see it protected.” Durlin is proud to protect public lands for future generations, saying, “The highlight of my childhood was our family’s weekend outdoor trips. I look forward to my grandchildren having similar experiences outside in their lifetimes, and it wouldn’t be possible without ONDA.”

ONDA alerts our members and supporters whenever opportunities to support public lands arise.

You can sign up for our e-newsletter to find out when and how to submit your comments on public lands issues, or when your elected official will be hosting a town hall meeting held by your member of Congress. But, you don’t have to wait for a specific opportunity to take action.

Here are five ways that you can take action for your lands at any time:

Explore. Get out and enjoy your public lands with friends and family. Discover new places to explore in Oregon’s high desert.

Share. Tell others in your community about the wild places you love and why they need protection.

Engage. Contact your elected leaders to tell them why public lands in Oregon’s high desert matter to you. Write a letter, make a phone call, or send an email to your members of Congress. Ask them what they’re doing to help protect public lands in Oregon’s high desert.

Amplify. Write a letter to the editor of your local paper to amplify your voice and let others know about public lands and why they’re important to you and others in your community.

Give. Member support makes ONDA an effective advocate for public lands. Make a contribution, or become a monthly donor, to ensure your public lands get the protection they deserve.