Defending wildlands and habitat

Jeremy Austin

Oregon Natural Desert Association’s strategic and effective enforcement of environmental laws has played a critical role in safeguarding Oregon’s desert public lands. We hold federal land management agencies accountable, ensuring that Oregon’s arid lands and waterways receive the protection they deserve.

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Sarah Graham, Sage Sustainers Member

Sarah Graham, Sage Sustainers Member

“I contribute to ONDA monthly because it adds up to a larger annual gift than what I’d be able to comfortably afford if I were to do a simple one-time donation annually. I’m able to give more to ONDA this way and have greater impact which is important to me, and my dog Polly.”

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Bobcat

Bobcat

Found only in North America, where it is the most common wildcat, the bobcat takes its common name from its stubby, or “bobbed,” tail. The cats range in length from two to four feet and weigh 14 to 29 pounds. Bobcats mainly hunt rabbits and hares, but they will also eat rodents, birds, bats, and even adult deer.

Latin name: Lynx rufus fasciatus

 

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Swallowtail

Swallowtail

The Oregon Swallowtail butterfly is the official state insect of Oregon and a true native of the Pacific Northwest. The Swallowtail can be seen in the lower sagebrush canyons of the Columbia River and its tributaries, including the Snake River drainage area.  Source: State Symbols USA

Latin name: Papilio oregonius

Enforcing conservation laws on your behalf

As the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 clearly states:

“The Congress recognizes that each person should enjoy a healthful environment and that each person has a responsibility to contribute to the preservation and enhancement of the environment.”

Since 2001, we have won or successfully settled more than 85 percent of our federal actions, protecting millions of acres of public land throughout Oregon as a result. 

Visit our Accomplishments page to learn more about ONDA’s significant legal achievements over the years.

Protecting imperiled species and irreplaceable wilderness areas

More than 350 species of plants and animals inhabit Oregon’s high desert, many more than most people realize.

Unfortunately, some of the wildlife native to this region is facing serious threats to survival due to habitat loss caused by a variety of factors, including poorly managed livestock grazing, invasive species, wildfire, and inappropriately sited energy development.

ONDA protects critical habitat, wildlife corridors, and ecosystems to give all species the best chance for survival. We operate under the principle that it does no good to protect a species if that species has nowhere safe to live, and we advocate for the highest level of protection possible for wild lands and waters.

Planning for responsible renewable energy development

ONDA supports responsible renewable energy that is planned smart from the start.

For Oregon, this means guiding projects to low-conflict zones–areas with high potential solar, wind, or geothermal resources that do not contain critical wildlife habitat, wilderness-quality lands, or sensitive cultural resources. We encourage policymakers to advance renewable energy policies that incentivize smart and responsible development.

“Renewable Energy in Oregon” report

Our report provides an overview of the policies, technologies, and issues related to Oregon’s ever-growing energy resource. It contains savvy insights, recommendations for a more efficient and responsible energy future, and useful information on siting, technologies, opportunities, and challenges.

Download the Report

Steens Wind

While ONDA supports renewable energy, we believe some places are not appropriate for any kind of large-scale development. We opposed theSteens Windproject associated with the North Steens Transmission Line proposed by Columbia Energy Developers due to its negative impacts on a congressionally protected area which is home to high priority Greater sage-grouse habitat and part of an important area for raptors.

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