Recreation Resources

Jim Davis   Website

Last updated: April 8, 2021

The spread of Covid-19 created a widespread closure of public lands and recreational facilities across the country. As outdoor spaces reopen, please be sure to be thoughtful and recreate responsibly by continuing to keep social distancing, wash your hands vigorously and frequently, and knowing what’s open and closed before you head out. For additional guidance, see recreateresponsibly.org

Note: As of July 1, 2020, Oregon state requires people ages 12 and older in Oregon to don a mask whenever they’re in a public indoor space. As of July 15, face coverings are also required in outdoor public spaces when social distancing of at least 6 feet is not possible.

As fire season approaches, please be mindful of fire bans. Use this map of fire restrictions to zoom in on your destination and check restrictions before you head out. Check for active fires and area closures from the following sources. Oregon Department of Forestry updates a map of active fires in the state, and InciWeb tracks large fires nationally. Central Oregon Fire Info provides detailed updates on local fires. Interagency dispatch centers in Burns, Vale, and Lakeview keep track of fires of all sizes in southeastern Oregon.

voices

Elisa Cheng, member since 2013

Elisa Cheng, member since 2013

“ONDA stewardship trips inspire me. I get to learn new things and see new places, and in the process perform important work that improves the wildlife habitat.”

voices

Sarah Graham, Sage Sustainers Member

Sarah Graham, Sage Sustainers Member

“I contribute to ONDA monthly because it adds up to a larger annual gift than what I’d be able to comfortably afford if I were to do a simple one-time donation annually. I’m able to give more to ONDA this way and have greater impact which is important to me, and my dog Polly.”

voices

Craig Terry, ONDA member and stewardship volunteer

Craig Terry, ONDA member and stewardship volunteer

“The people I have had the privilege to share time with each season keep me volunteering again and again. Who else but those ONDA staff leaders would make fresh coffee at dawn each morning or pack a watermelon all day to serve as a reward under a juniper in a steep canyon?” Craig, who grew up in northwestern Nevada, says ONDA connects him with places he loves and a mission he believes in. “My grandfather and his father put up wire fences for their ranching needs. Taking out barbed wire sort of completes a circle for me.”

Federal Lands

Bureau of Land Management
Reopening Summary

With the lifting of public health and safety restrictions enacted by local, county and state officials, the BLM is beginning phased reopening. Many campgrounds, restrooms and day-use facilities (i.e. locations with picnic areas and/or restrooms) are reopened. Some BLM District and Field Offices have restored access with limited in-person services. Contact districts for specific information.

National Forests
Reopening Summary

Most developed sites in Region 6 have reopened, including many campgrounds. Check interactive map and recreation reports for specific site information and contact district offices for detailed information.

 

Reopening Summary

Camp Hart Mountain and Hot Springs Campgrounds are open. Refuge lands are open.

Malheur Refuge visitor’s center, store, and museum are closed. Refuge lands, trails, and bathrooms are open.

Reopening Summary

Crater Lake: Winter road closures are still in effect. The Visitor Centers are closed, but restrooms are open and some food services will reopen April 9.

John Day Fossil Beds:

Picnic areas and trails are open at the Clarno, Sheep Rock, and Painted Hills Units.

The Thomas Condon Paleontology and Visitor Center and Painted Hills Contact station remain closed.

Newbury Volcanic:

Lava Lands and Paulina Visitor Centers are closed.

Tribal Lands

Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs
Closure Summary

All tribal conservation areas are closed, including Pine Creek Conservation Area.

State Lands

Reopening Summary

Most parks are now open to day use, check the interactive map for use restrictions and contact parks directly. Many campgrounds have opened as well, although services may be reduced, check the interactive map for details. Some cabins, yurts, hiker/biker sites, and group facilities remain closed.

Oregon Fish and Wildlife
Reopening Summary

ODFW Wildlife Areas are open for day use and camping (where allowed). Offices and fish hatcheries remain closed to the public. Hunting and fishing in Oregon is open to nonresidents.

Central Oregon Parks

Bend Parks and Recreation
Reopening Summary

Parks and trails remain open with the social distancing rules in place. Park restrooms are open. Stake parks and pickleball, tennis, horseshoes and bocce ball courts are open. Playgrounds are now open. Off-leash dog areas, picnic shelters and restrooms remain open. Rivers are open for floating. Maintain social distancing while recreating.

Basketball courts are closed.

The South Canyon stretch of the Deschutes River Trail is temporarily a one-direction trail until further notice. This trail is temporarily closed to bikes.

Redmond Parks and Recreation
Reopening Summary

The Activity Center and Swim Center are open with limited hours and reservations required. Parks and trails are open with social distancing rules.

Crook County Parks
Reopening Summary

Most facilities are open. Some seasonal closures are still in effect. Check the website or contact the Parks Department for details on specific sites.

Rivers

Reopening Summary

All launches, take-outs, dispersed and designated campgrounds for the Lower Deschutes River are open. Boater passes are required.

John Day River
Reopening Summary

All launches and take-outs except the Thirtymile Launch (not accessible by vehicle from Dec 1 – April 15, for the winter road closure) are open. Permits are required.

Reopening Summary

Ramp at BLM Spring Recreation site is open. Ramps in Hells Canyon National Recreation Area are open.

Lower Owyhee River
Reopening Summary

Boat ramps are open.