Lower John Day

Greg Burke   Website

Drawn to the exhilarating rapids, remote canyons, and thriving fishery, more than 10,000 people float the 72-mile long Clarno to Cottonwood stretch of the Lower John Day River each year.

voices

Terry Butler, 2018 Volunteer of the Year

Terry Butler, 2018 Volunteer of the Year

“If I have to pick a favorite place in Oregon’s high desert, it would be Sutton Mountain, but I’m excited about all of the Wilderness Study Areas,” says Terry, adding, “Each is a gem to explore, and I hope they all get protection someday… I love the scale of the physical beauty of the desert.”

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Bitteroot

Bitteroot

Bitteroot blooms on north-facing cliffs in western North America.

The Paiute name for bitteroot is kangedya. Traditional Native American uses of the plant included eating the roots, mixed with berries and meat, and using the roots to treat sore throats.

 

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Tibetan Monks Visit Sutton Mountain

Tibetan Monks Visit Sutton Mountain

A thrilling river ride, with wild lands to explore

To be sure, it is an incredible paddling experience, but what makes the experience so coveted by river enthusiasts lies just beyond the river itself: acres of public land offering great hiking and true solitude. The 70-mile stretch of Wild and Scenic River is framed by three Wilderness Study Areas; North Pole Ridge, Thirtymile and Lower John Day, totalling more than 39,000 acres and endless cross country hiking opportunities. Look for bighorn sheep on the basalt cliffs, effusive wildflowers in the grassy rolling hills and pictographs in the caves that pepper the landscape.

Steve Roelof   Website

Sage Brown   Website

Greg Burke   Website

Steve Roelof   Website

ONDA is working with the neighboring communities to build a conservation proposal that balances the best interests of local residents, recreation-oriented visitors, and fish and wildlife. If you’re interested in helping shape this proposal, please contact Ben Gordon, ben@onda.org.

Conserving the best of the region

To ensure this stretch of federally designated Wild and Scenic River and the nearby lands remain the recreation and wildlife haven they are today, ONDA has devised the Lower John Day Conservation Proposal. This initiative would combine several Wilderness Study Areas, public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management, into a 54,300-acre protected area. Doing so would expand the recreational potential of the region, bolster local economies, and support ecological health.