Tribal Stewards

Sage Brown   Website

ONDA launched our Tribal Stewards program in 2019 to provide paid opportunities for Indigenous youth and young adults to work on restoration projects and gain experience in conservation and stewardship career paths. The goal of this program is to support emerging conservation leaders in tribal communities while completing projects to improve ecosystem health in Oregon’s high desert.

Through an immersive field‐based program, participants restore streams, uplands and trails on federal and tribal lands and conduct scientific research and monitoring. In addition to gaining practical training, the tribal stewards receive mentorship from natural resources professionals and explore potential career pathways.

voices

Ryan “Dirtmonger” Sylva, ODT thru-hiker 2017

Ryan “Dirtmonger” Sylva, ODT thru-hiker 2017

“To me, it’s a thru-hike in an isolated place that promotes a conversation in land management, ethics and usage. Hiking across a vast and remote landscape and having a random and chance encounter with cowboys and hunters to discuss how ‘all of us’ should treat the land, how we all have a responsibility, no matter our political leanings, really showed me the pulse of the people in rural areas, especially here out west.”

watch

Discover Desert Pronghorn

Discover Desert Pronghorn

success

Central Oregon’s “Backyard Wilderness”

Central Oregon’s “Backyard Wilderness”

Our quest to protect the Oregon Badlands

Located just 15 miles east of Bend, Oregon Badlands is a 30,000-acre wilderness area filled with fascinating lava flows and ancient juniper trees Arriving in the Badlands, so named for its rugged and harsh terrain, can feel like stepping

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Lace Thornberg

Sage Brown

Sage Brown   Website

Tribal Stewards Projects

ONDA partners with tribes, land managers, and other non-profit organizations to plan and coordinate Tribal Stewards projects throughout Oregon’s high desert.

Since 2019, the Tribal Stewards crews have worked across eastern Oregon on a range on restoration projects, including:

  • Retrofitting fence to be wildlife friendly and maintaining trails at the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument
  • Improving upland habitat through juniper abatement and seed collection on Burns Paiute Tribe’s Jonesboro property
  • Restoring native fish habitat along headwater creeks of the John Day River by building and maintaining beaver dam analogues and planting native vegetation in the Malheur National Forest
  • Completing fish surveys and native plant projects at Burn Paiute Tribe’s Logan Valley property
  • Building fences to protect headwater springs and creeks of the Malheur River in the Malheur National Forest