What Wild & Scenic
Looks Like

Sean Bagshaw   Website

listen

Great Horned Owls and Western Screech Owls

Great Horned Owls and Western Screech Owls

voices

Cregg Large, member since 2009

Cregg Large, member since 2009

“I came to Oregon 12 years ago from Texas. Texas, for all its size, has very little public land. Coming to Oregon has made me realize the special gift we as Americans have in our public lands. Volunteering with an organization like ONDA is my way of reciprocating for this gift. Through restoration efforts, I feel we are helping leave a better place than we found it. Through advocating for protection for public lands, we safeguard migration routes for animals and keep the land where it belongs: with the public.”

fact

Young Horny Toad Lizard

Young Horny Toad Lizard

In the summer these lizards begin foraging for food as soon as their body temperature rises as the heat of the day increases. They feed on slow-moving, ground-dwelling insects. In the fall they hibernate by burying themselves in the sand.

Latin name: Phrysonoma platyrhinos

Desert Lakes

Quintessential of the Basin and Range landscape, Lake Abert and other desert lakes provide vital habitat for an astounding diversity and abundance of wildlife, including tens of thousands of migratory birds. Lake Abert and its sources, like the Chewaucan River and Poison Creek, which pours off the dramatic Abert Rim, are threatened by climate change and upstream water diversions for agriculture.

Jim Davis

Mountain Streams

High up on desert peaks like Steens Mountain, streams like Cottonwood Creek arise as a trickle that can transform with spring snowmelt into a raging torrent. As ONDA member Julie Weikel fantastically described, “for brief weeks or even just days each spring, the jubilant celebrating streams move boulders, rip out tree roots, and raise a little canyon hell.” These small but mighty creeks sustain populations of rare Lahontan cutthroat trout and wildflower-filled meadows that provide critical habitat for sage-grouse and other desert species.

Mark Darnell   Website

Canyon-carving Creeks

Boasting stunning scenery and exposing millenia of stunning geology and rocky spires, powerful waterways, like Succor Creek, are a refuge for sensitive wildlife such as California bighorn sheep, golden eagles, and redband trout. Many desert canyons are also sacred and traditional sites for the Northern Paiute people and other indigenous communities who continue to live and gather food and medicine in Oregon’s high desert.

Sean Bagshaw   Website

Salmon-bearing Rivers

Salmon and steelhead journey hundreds of miles deep into northeastern Oregon to spawn in the North Fork John Day and its tributaries. Stretching nearly 40 miles through spectacular scenery, the last unprotected stretch of the North Fork John Day also provides wild water and rare solitude for boaters willing to make the trek to enjoy its remote canyonlands.

Greg Burke   Website

Oases in the Sagebrush Sea

From nesting songbirds to sensitive native trout, desert creeks are vital to life in an otherwise arid landscape. Rock Creek, on the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge, is one example of these ribbons of green bursting with life.

Jim Oleachea

What Wild & Scenic
Looks Like

Did you know that, in addition to rivers, the Wild and Scenic Rivers Act can also protect creeks, streams and lakes?  Wild and Scenic desert waters take many forms and every drop of desert water plays an important role in the desert ecosystem. From mighty salmon-bearing rivers, like the North Fork John Day, to...

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Steppe It Up for the
Greater Hart-Sheldon Region

How would you manage few million acres of public lands in Oregon’s desert? Later this summer, you will have a critical opportunity to answer that question. The Bureau of Land Management will be seeking input from the public on the Lakeview Resource Management Plan Amendment. This process will lay the foundation for how more...

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Conservation Update:
Halfway Through 2020

Taking stock of these unprecedented times and all that our communities and the country have experienced in recent months, it is difficult to believe the year 2020 is only half over. For ONDA, these events have highlighted the need for further reflection and evolution as individuals and as an organization. And it has required...

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A Wilderness Inventory

The fate of more than three million acres in the Greater Hart-Sheldon will be determined in 2020, as the Lakeview District of the Bureau of Land Management considers how they will manage resources in this landscape. Public comments will be accepted for a short period of time once their draft management plan is release....

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A New Plan for 5 Million Acres

5 Reasons to Care, 3 Topics to Understand, 1 click to comment How would you manage 5 million acres? Right now, you have a once-in-a-generation chance to answer that very question. The Bureau of Land Management is seeking input from the public on the Southeast Oregon Resource Management Plan Amendment (SEORMP), a process that...

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What Now for Sage-Grouse

Our Efforts to Protect an Imperiled Species Greater sage-grouse, a symbol of the Intermountain West, are in trouble. Despite the clear evidence of the species’ decline the Department of the Interior has signaled that it intends to roll back the vital protections established in the BLM’s 2015 sage-grouse plan. We’re deeply concerned that this...

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Our Take on Sec. Zinke’s Secret Monuments Report

The public finally has access to the Trump administration’s report on the review of 27 national monuments, but only because it was leaked to the press. Astonishingly, Zinke’s memo to the president still fails to provide key details on changes he’s recommending to these jewels of our public lands. Zinke’s report lacks clarity on...

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Wilderness Values: A View from Above

Oregon Natural Desert Association employee Jeremy Austin realizes a childhood dream, and takes to the sky across southeastern Oregon with LightHawk. Photos by Jim Davis with aerial support by LightHawk. If you could have any superpower, what would it be? As kids growing up, we used to ask ourselves this question almost daily. For...

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