A Thru-Hiker’s Message – Stay Home

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Time Lapse: a night at Canyon Camp in six seconds

Time Lapse: a night at Canyon Camp in six seconds

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Wind and Birds in Quaking Aspen

Wind and Birds in Quaking Aspen

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Helen Harbin, ONDA Board Member

Helen Harbin, ONDA Board Member

“I connect with Oregon’s high desert through my feet, my eyes, my sense of smell, and all the things I hear. Getting out there is a whole body experience.” Supporting ONDA, Helen says, not only connects her with wild landscapes, but is also a good investment. “I felt like if I gave them $20, they might squeeze $23 out of it.”

About the author

Riley (they/them) is a trans, long-distance hiker who is currently living in Seattle, Washington with their two cats. They have hiked over 3,000 miles, including the PCT and ODT. When they aren’t hiking, you can find them reading queer sci-fi/fantasy, researching high routes, and petting other people’s dogs. Riley wrote and published a zine about their 2019 hike on the Oregon Desert Trail, and is donating a portion of zine sales proceeds to ONDA. Order your copy today by emailing Riley, or by contacting them on Instagram.

You can follow their Instagram @rileyhikes for photos and updates from their latest adventure, and read more of their writing at rileyonroute.wordpress.com.

A Thru-Hiker’s Message – Stay Home

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