Willow Harvest – Feb 24

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Spring Basin Wilderness

Spring Basin Wilderness

Spring Basin Wilderness

With 10,000 acres of undulating terrain, secluded canyons and spectacular vantages of the John Day Country, Spring Basin is magnificent to explore This public treasure, forever protected as Wilderness, offers a profusion of desert wildflowers in the spring and year-round recreational opportunities for hikers, horseback

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Western Rattlesnake

Western Rattlesnake

Also known as the Great Basin Rattlesnake, these pit vipers have buff-tan coloring and small, oval blotches to blend into their arid surroundings. Small heat-sensing indentations on each side of the snake’s snout detects warm-blooded prey for better striking accuracy in the dark. Source: The Oregon Encyclopedia

Latin name: Crotalus oreganus lutosus

listen

Cottonwood Canyon Riparian Soundscape

Cottonwood Canyon Riparian Soundscape

Organizer: Michael O’Casey

Date and Time: February 24, 2018, 10:00 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Place: Clarno, OR

Camp: Day trip

Difficulty Rating: Level 1: Easy

Maximum Group Size: no limit

About the place

The Clarno Nursery, officially named the Clarno Hardwood Propagation Facility, is a collaborative project between the U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management. Up to 50,000 willows, cottonwoods and other native trees are harvested annually from this facility for restoration projects around the northwest. ONDA has been working with the Clarno Nursery for almost a decade and we’re keeping the cooperative spirit alive with annual winter trips to harvest materials to be used on ONDA restoration projects throughout eastern Oregon. Located along the banks of the John Day River the Clarno Nursery is picturesque as well as important to ecological restoration efforts.

About the stewardship work

The focus for this event will be cutting and collecting lengths of willow and cottonwood for ONDA’s riparian restoration projects on the South Fork Crooked River, Muleshoe Creek, and the middle Deschutes. The plants that we harvest will be cut into three-foot-long slips, tied in bundles for easy transportation, then stored in a Forest Service cooler until planting season begins in March. On the planting trips, these sticks are stuck in the ground, and in a few months you can have a nice little shrub! For this trip, volunteers can perform three different tasks: cutting the plants; collecting and transporting the plants; and preparing the plants for storage. With assembly-line efficiency, we hope to prepare well over a thousand planting sticks all while having a great time and enjoying the beautiful outdoor setting!

View map

Trip timeline

  • Saturday, February 24 (10 a.m):  Meet at the Clarno Nursery which is about a two-hour drive from Bend. (Carpooling will be available)
  • Saturday, February 24 (3:30 p.m):  We’ll work until 3:30 with the hopes of getting people back to Bend by 5:30 pm.

Difficulty

Level 1: Easy

The physical demands of this trip are moderate. Work involves squatting or bending over, carrying light-weight armfuls of sticks, cutting sticks with loppers, and gripping stick bundles to tie them up. The work area is flat and the greatest challenge is to avoid tripping on the small stumps once the trees have been harvested. Everyone will be able to work at their own pace and we will rotate jobs so that everyone gets a chance to learn each task. Cold and breezy weather is possible, but rain would postpone the event.

Participant responsibilities

Participants are responsible for their own food and water/beverages. Carpooling will be available with ONDA staff or other volunteers if available. Sturdy hiking boots are recommended, close-toed shoes are required (no sandals). These plots have very dense trees and likely some muddy areas so eye protection and appropriate footwear are essential.

Gear provided

ONDA will provide all the tools necessary for the work as well as extra gloves and extra eye protection if needed. Coffee and hot water for tea will also be provided to keep the chill off.

Registration

An ONDA registration application and medical form are required for this trip.

Apply Now

You only need to fill this form out once per year and can join additional trips this year by e-mailing the trip leader directly. You will receive a confirmation e-mail within 10 working days of submitting your form. The confirmation e-mail will provide information regarding which trips you are on the “participant list” for, and which trips are full, and therefore you have been placed on the “wait list.”

Six weeks before the start of the trip, the trip leader will send out an RSVP to make sure everyone is still able to participate. Based on RSVPs, open spaces will be backfilled with people from the waitlist.

Registered and confirmed participants will receive driving instructions, maps, car-pooling options, and additional information in an email sent by the trip leader three weeks before the trip start date.

If you have any questions in the meantime, please don’t hesitate to contact the trip leader.

Willow Harvest – Feb 24

Join us at the beautiful Clarno Nursery as we prepare willows for spring planting!

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Spring Basin Wilderness

Spring Basin Wilderness With 10,000 acres of undulating terrain, secluded canyons and spectacular vantages of the John Day Country, Spring Basin is magnificent to explore. This public treasure, forever protected as Wilderness, offers a profusion of desert wildflowers in the spring and year-round recreational opportunities for hikers, horseback riders, hunters and botanists alike. A...

Read More

Western Rattlesnake

Also known as the Great Basin Rattlesnake, these pit vipers have buff-tan coloring and small, oval blotches to blend into their arid surroundings. Small heat-sensing indentations on each side of the snake’s snout detects warm-blooded prey for better striking accuracy in the dark. Source: The Oregon Encyclopedia Latin name: Crotalus oreganus lutosus

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Stewardship Pronghorn Fence

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Cottonwood Canyon Riparian Soundscape

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Horse Mountain to Spring Basin

From the trailhead, hike north cross-country for 0.4 miles until you intersect a trail. Follow the trail right to Spring Basin Canyon. At the next junction, turn right toward the canyon bottom. Follow the trail as it eventually loops back around west and it will intersect Clarno Road as the John Day River comes...

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Black Canyon

Most of the hikes in the area ascend Sutton Mountain, but this Black Canyon hike offers a nice change of pace. Its relatively flat bottom is perfect for any hiker who wants to experience the serenity of Oregon’s high desert. Along with the sagebrush and juniper characteristic of the high desert, Sutton Mountain provides...

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Visitor’s Guide
to the John Day River Basin

See for yourself the rugged allure of the John Day River Basin, with its vast expanses of windswept high desert, endless mountains, and picturesque meandering rivers. Within a few hours drive of Bend lies a scenic wonderland of big sky and stunning geography. The John Day River Basin offers day hikes, backcountry rambling, river...

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At 4,700 feet tall, Sutton Mountain towers over the surrounding landscape. With a steep, craggy west side and a rolling, grassy eastern face, the mountain has a mysterious Jekyll and Hyde quality. Sutton Mountain is home to bountiful wildflowers in the spring and vibrant herds of pronghorn, elk, and mule deer. Here solitude is...

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