Lower John Day

Greg Burke   Website

fact

Western Rattlesnake

Western Rattlesnake

Also known as the Great Basin Rattlesnake, these pit vipers have buff-tan coloring and small, oval blotches to blend into their arid surroundings. Small heat-sensing indentations on each side of the snake’s snout detects warm-blooded prey for better striking accuracy in the dark. Source: The Oregon Encyclopedia

Latin name: Crotalus oreganus lutosus

watch

Tibetan Monks Visit Sutton Mountain

Tibetan Monks Visit Sutton Mountain

fact

Bitteroot

Bitteroot

Bitteroot blooms on north-facing cliffs in western North America.

The Paiute name for bitteroot is kangedya. Traditional Native American uses of the plant included eating the roots, mixed with berries and meat, and using the roots to treat sore throats.

 

A thrilling river ride, with wild lands to explore

To be sure, it is an incredible paddling experience, but what makes the experience so coveted by river enthusiasts lies just beyond the river itself: acres of public land offering great hiking and true solitude. The 70-mile stretch of Wild and Scenic River is framed by three Wilderness Study Areas; North Pole Ridge, Thirtymile and Lower John Day, totalling more than 39,000 acres and endless cross country hiking opportunities. Look for bighorn sheep on the basalt cliffs, effusive wildflowers in the grassy rolling hills and pictographs in the caves that pepper the landscape.

Steve Roelof   Website

Sage Brown   Website

Greg Burke   Website

Steve Roelof   Website

ONDA is working with the neighboring communities to build a conservation proposal that balances the best interests of local residents, recreation-oriented visitors, and fish and wildlife. If you’re interested in helping shape this proposal, please contact Ben Gordon, ben@onda.org.

Conserving the best of the region

To ensure this stretch of federally designated Wild and Scenic River and the nearby lands remain the recreation and wildlife haven they are today, ONDA has devised the Lower John Day Conservation Proposal. This initiative would combine several Wilderness Study Areas, public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management, into a 54,300-acre protected area. Doing so would expand the recreational potential of the region, bolster local economies, and support ecological health.

Lower John Day

Drawn to the exhilarating rapids, remote canyons, and thriving fishery, more than 10,000 people float the 72-mile long Clarno to Cottonwood stretch of the Lower John Day River each year.

Read More

John Day River Basin

Read More

Our Take on Sec. Zinke’s Secret Monuments Report

The public finally has access to the Trump administration’s report on the review of 27 national monuments, but only because it was leaked to the press. Astonishingly, Zinke’s memo to […]

Read More

How to Talk to Your Friends about Public Lands

For most outdoor recreationists, talking about being out in nature comes, well, naturally. We share photos from our trips. We rave about the views we enjoyed and the wildlife we encountered. […]

Read More

Kirk Richardson: Alice Elshoff Award winner

For more than a decade, Kirk Richardson has been a strong voice for protecting Oregon’s high desert. He’s served on the Oregon Natural Desert Association Board of Directors, helped dream […]

Read More

Climate change in the sagebrush sea

Dr. Megan Creutzburg is a researcher at Oregon State University’s Institute for Natural Resources, where she provides technical coordination for the Oregon Sage Grouse Conservation Partnership (SageCon). With climate marches happening […]

Read More

Celebrating 30 years of high desert conservation

For three decades, ONDA has been a strong, consistent voice for Oregon’s high desert. It all began in 1987 with extraordinary people concerned about an extraordinary place, and today has […]

Read More